Q: My dog had two brief seizures last weekend. Should I be concerned?

A:  Seizures are always abnormal and warrant a visit to your veterinarian.  Brief seizures in and of themselves are not particularly dangerous.  However, they are frequently a symptom of serious problems.  In pets seizures are caused by five basic categories of...

10 things that veterinarians wish more pet owners would do

#1 – Have your pet examined every six months. A thorough physical examination on a regular basis allows for earlier intervention in diseases. Even if your pet is found to be perfectly healthy, more frequent physical examinations allow you and your veterinarian to be...

Q: What should I do if my dog gets bitten by a copperhead snake?

A: First, do not panic. Try to stay calm so your dog does not get too excited. Second, try to get a really good look at the snake without getting too close. Is it really a copperhead? Or is it just a brown water snake, corn snake, or other look alike? Most snake bites...

Q: Is an echocardiogram the same thing as an EKG?

A:  No.  An echocardiogram is a detailed ultrasound examination of the heart.  It includes measurement of the chamber sizes, evaluation of blood flow, calculation of contractility and cardiac output, and documentation of abnormal structures.  EKG, or alternatively...

Q: What is “color Doppler?”

A:  Christian Doppler was a 19th century physicist who determined a way to measure the speed of a moving object using sound waves.  Today, this principle is used for a variety of uses including catching speeders and predicting weather.  Advanced ultrasound machines...

Q: When is an ultrasound used instead of an X-ray?

A:  Each technology has strengths and weaknesses and is therefore ideal for different circumstances.  In general, X-rays are great at imaging hard tissues or objects.  It is also a good technology to visualize anything surrounded by air.  Ultrasound machines use sound...

Q: My 7 year old hound has a large, swollen gland or tear duct on the inside of her eye and another large, round mass in one of her teats. She has had three litters, but not since three years ago. The eye has pus coming from behind the mass, but she hasn’t seemed to respond to amoxicillin or cephalexin. I am thinking either cysts, an infection or cancer. Any ideas?

A:  While possible, it would be unusual for a mammary gland tumor to spread to the eye or vice versa.  At the inside corner of the eye it is not uncommon in hound breeds to have a prolapsed third eyelid gland.  This is a tear gland that lives underneath the third...